Photo de stock - Casa Mila, La Pedrera, skyline of Barcelona, Spain. The chimneys. Panorama of the roof at dusk, evening, night. Unesco Heritage. Even if architecture isn’t your thing, Gaudí’s trippy Casa Milà or La Pedrera, the quarry on Passeig de Gràcia is a must-see. The house’s undulating face, lack of right angles, and surrealistic flourishes -twisted ironwork, chimneys shaped like soldiers- raised eyebrows when it was completed around 1912 but is now considered one of Gaudí’s greatest achievements. It was deemed a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984, along with the other Gaudí buildings in the city. The entrance fee is around $23, but it’s nada to soak up the fantastical facade from the sidewalk. La Pedrera, also known as the Casa Milà, is an architectural work by Antonio Gaudí located on the famous Passeig de Gracia in Barcelona´s Eixample district. Built between 1906 and 1910 in distinct Modernist style, this house is a clear example of Gaudi´s architectural style, dominated by curves and organic forms that evoke nature. The building has five floors, a cellar and a terrace roof, plus two large courtyards. For the construction of the Casa Milà, Gaudi was aided by his assistants Domènec Sugrañes and Josep Canaleta, plus builder Josep Bayó i Font, who had worked with him on the Casa Batlló project. The Casa Milà was declared a National Historic-Artistic Monument in 1969 and a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1984. Since 1986, the Casa Milà has been owned by the Caixa Catalunya bank. In summer, the terrace serves as a venue for outdoor concerts.

Photo de stock: Casa Mila, La Pedrera, skyline of Barcelona, Spain. The chimneys. Panorama of the roof at dusk, evening, night. Unesco Heritage.

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